Strategies for Reducing Airborne Coronavirus Transmission at HOLT Architects’ office

MariaHOLT News

Following up on our Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) studies, simulating the spread of COVID-19 droplets in our office, we wanted to share some observations and strategies on how we could reduce the risk of transmission within our space.

There is so much information being circulated on how to contain the coronavirus & we hope the ideas we share may help in some way.

 

After extensive exploration with consulting engineers and vendors, we have begun to develop possible approaches for making our offices safer, and categorized them into two areas: strategies that target general indoor air quality and strategies that target a direct concentrated cloud of particles through physically blocking or compartmentalizing space or environments.

Click on the video and see the bullet points below for more details.

 

1) Strategies that target general indoor air quality through diluting, removing, and filtering infectious droplets out of the air. It is believed that the coronavirus can hang in the air for extended periods of time. For this reason, increasing the number of air changes, filtering, and diluting the air could help reduce the spread. Click on the video above and reference the following articles for more information: Controlling COVID-19 Transference through Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning Systems, Experts Agree on Aerosol Transmission of COVID-19: How Can Schools Manage Indoor Air to Stop the Spread?, Covid-19 Resources Available to Address Concerns. 

2) Strategies that target a direct concentrated cloud of particles through physically blocking or compartmentalizing space or environments. The use of physical barriers and air sanitation equipment can block or eliminate possible infectious particles as another form of defense. Click on the video above for more information.

There is still much more to learn about the Coronavirus, and at this time a vaccine does not exist. As such, we need to understand that few high-occupancy buildings or spaces can be “100% safe” but there is much we can do to make our environments safer.

Thank you for listening, let us know if you’d like to hear more and please reach out with any questions to Steve Hugo, Principal at sh@holt.com or 607.273.7600.